Art, Interesting, Movies, Writing

Alice Adams challenge

This is another good film to watch. Can we modernize this character. What would Alice do in your area?
Create a short story about Alice.

Alice Adams is a 1935 romantic film made by RKO. It was directed by George Stevens and produced by Pandro S. Berman. The screenplay was by Dorothy Yost, Mortimer Offner, and Jane Murfin. The film was adapted from the novel Alice Adams, by Booth Tarkington. The music score was by Max Steiner and Roy Webb, and the cinematography by Robert De Grasse.

The film is about a young woman in a medium-sized town in the United States in the early 1900s, and her pretentious attempts to appear upper-class and wed a wealthy man while concealing her poverty. It stars Katharine Hepburn, Fred MacMurray, Fred Stone and Evelyn Venable. Hepburn’s popularity had declined after her Oscar-winning performance in 1933’s Morning Glory; her performance in Alice Adams made her a public favorite again.

Plot
Alice Adams is the youngest daughter of the Adams family. Her father is an invalid employed as a clerk in a factory owned by Mr. Lamb, who has kept Adams on salary for years despite his lengthy illness. Her mother is embittered by her husband’s lack of ambition and upset by the snubs her daughter endures because of their poverty. Alice’s older brother, Walte, is a gambler who cannot hold a job and who associates with African Americans (which, given the time period in which the film is set, is considered a major social embarrassment). As the film begins, Alice attends a dance given by the wealthy Henrietta Lamb. She has no date, and is escorted to the occasion by Walter. Alice is a social climber like her mother, and engages in socially inappropriate behavior and conversation in an attempt to impress others. At the dance, Alice meets wealthy Arthur Russell, who is charmed by her despite her poverty.

Alice’s mother nags her husband into quitting his job and pouring his life savings into a glue factory. Mr. Lamb ostracizes Mr. Adams from society, believing that Adams stole the glue formula from him. Alice is the subject of cruel town gossip, which Russell ignores.

Alice invites Russell to the Adams home for a fancy meal. She and her mother put on airs, the entire family dresses inappropriately in formal wear despite the hot summer night, and the Adamses pretend that they eat caviar and fancy, rich-tasting food all the time. The dinner is ruined by the slovenly behavior and poor cooking skills of the maid the Adamses have hired for the occasion, Malena (Hattie McDaniel). Mr. Adams unwittingly embarrasses Alice by exposing the many lies she has told Russell. When Walter shows up with bad financial news, Alice gently expels Russell from the house now that everything is “ruined.”

Walter reveals that “a friend” has gambling debts, and that he stole $150 from Mr. Lamb to cover them. Mr. Adams decides to take out a loan against his new factory to save Walter from jail. Just then, Mr. Lamb appears at the Adams house. He accuses Adams of stealing the glue formula from him, and declares his intention to ruin Adams by building a glue factory directly across the street from the Adams plant. The men argue violently, but their friendship is saved when Alice confesses that her parents took the glue formula only so she could have a better life and some social status. Lamb and Adams reconcile, and Lamb indicates he will not prosecute Walter.

Alice wanders out onto the porch, where Russell has been waiting for her. He confesses his love for her, despite her poverty and family problems.

The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture, and Hepburn for Best Actress. Hepburn received the second most votes, after winner Bette Davis in Dangerous.
Production

The 1935 film of Alice Adams is the second adaptation of the Tarkington novel. A silent film version had been made in 1923, directed by Rowland V. Lee.

Katharine Hepburn wanted George Cukor to direct the film, but Cukor was engaged directing David Copperfield.[6] Cukor advised her to choose either William Wyler or George Stevens to direct. Although Hepburn favored the German-born and Swiss-educated Wyler, producer Pandro S. Berman favored American George Stevens.

The plot of the film differs from the book Alice Adams, in significant ways. Most importantly, the novel depicts Alice estranged from Russell. The original script by Dorothy Yost and Jane Murfin ended with Alice and Russell in love. But Stevens was so unhappy with the script and the ending that he, his friend Mortimer Offner, and Hepburn discarded most of it and rewrote it (using dialogue taken from the novel). Their script ended with Alice’s relationship with Russell up in the air, and finished with a scene in which Alice goes to secretarial school. But Berman and RKO executives wanted a happy ending in which Alice gets Russell. Stevens and Hepburn opposed this change. Berman enlisted the aid of Cukor, who agreed that the more realistic ending would be box office poison. So the script was changed to allow Russell to fall in love with Alice and win her over.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Adams_%28film%29

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Art, Interesting, Movies, Writing

challenge time

Smiling through is a great movie of love, sacrifice and bravery. Can you recreate it for the modern time.
Get your story telling skills out and create something.

Watch the movie…

Smilin’ Through is a 1932 MGM Romance-Drama film based on the play by Jane Cowl and Jane Murfin, also named Smilin’ Through.

The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture for 1932. It was adapted from Cowl and Murfin’s play by James Bernard Fagan, Donald Ogden Stewart, Ernest Vajda and Claudine West. The movie was directed by Sidney Franklin (who also directed an earlier version in 1922) and starred Norma Shearer, Fredric March, Leslie Howard and Ralph Forbes.

Synopsis
John Carteret (Leslie Howard) is a wealthy man with a huge estate. He was set to marry Moonyeen Clare (Norma Shearer), but on their wedding day she was accidentally killed during the wedding ceremony by her drunken and jealous ex-fiance Jeremy Wayne (Fredric March), who actually meant to kill John. John has spent the rest of his life in mourning. However, Moonyeen has kept in touch with him from the next life. He runs the estate, and has a private retreat where he communicates with her spirit.

His close friend Dr. Owens (O.P. Heggie) tells him of Moonyeen’s niece Kathleen, whose parents have drowned at sea. He begs John to adopt the child, and he does. Kathleen is five, but as she grows older she looks exactly like the dead Moonyeen (and is also played by Norma Shearer). Her childhood friend Willie (Ralph Forbes) wants to marry her, but she is interested in Kenneth Wayne (also played by Fredric March), whom she meets in dangerous and romantic circumstances. However, Kenneth is the son of Jeremy, Moonyeen’s killer, who disappeared and was never found.

John refuses to let them marry and threatens to disinherit her. She leaves with Kenneth, but he sends her back again because he doesn’t want to ruin her life. However, John has been deeply affected by the events and has lost his ability to communicate with his dead wife, who perceives his anger and hatred as having set up a barrier she can’t overcome.

Kenneth signs up for the Army and is gone for four years, returning as a disabled war veteran. He hides his condition, claims he no longer cares for Kathleen, and plans to go to America. John finds out the truth from Dr. Owens. He sees that Kenneth really cares for Kathleen and is not like his wastrel father. He tells Kathleen, and she runs off to tell Kenneth she still cares for him. John sits down to play chess with Dr. Owens, but apparently dozes off. Amused, Dr. Owens leaves him so that he can take his nap. John, however, has actually died, and his spirit now rises to join the awaiting spirit of Moonyeen, just as Kathleen is heard returning with Kenneth. John and Moonyeen are finally reunited in death.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smilin%27_Through_%281932_film%29

Writing

Writing challenge

Writing challenge

Paste Travel encourages writers to participate in its biweekly essay contest. Winning pieces will be published and winning authors will receive $50.

Every two weeks (starting today, March 24) the lines open for a new contest. Submission lines close for that biweekly competition one week later (for this week, midnight March 31). The winning essay will be published the following Tuesday (April 7, for this contest), at which time the process begins again for the following two-week period.

We salute creativity, challenge entrants to take chances and promote freedom of expression. By all means, take your writer’s voice for a ride and see where it takes you. The hope here is that this contest will encourage participants to share their singular travel moments with the rest of us on this grand, one-way excursion called life.

Requirements:

-Essay subject matter must be travel in nature.
-Stories must be nonfiction.
-Pieces cannot exceed 500 words in length … no exceptions.
-Paste freelancers and employees are not eligible to participate.
-Submissions must be original works that have not been previously published.

Please submit your essay to pastecontest@gmail.com. Though 500 words may seem short, the length is ample for pieces to be thoughtful and economically poetic … and worthy of a crown. 

We look forward to reading about your adventures and wish you the best of luck with the contest.